Daily Briefing :- 29/11/16

Here is CurrentHow’s Daily Briefing™ for the 29th of November, 2016 :-

1. Colombia plane crash : 75 dead on Brazil’s soccer team’s charter flight :-

Rescue workers stand at the wreckage site of a chartered airplane that crashed in a mountainous area outside Medellin, Colombia, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016

A plane carrying 81 people, including a top Brazilian football team, has crashed on its approach to the city of Medellin in Colombia. Colombia’s civil aviation body says only six people survived the crash, blamed on an electrical fault.

The chartered aircraft, flying from Brazil via Bolivia, was carrying members of the Chapecoense team. The team had been due to play in the final of the Copa Sudamericana, against Medellin team Atletico Nacional. Organisers say Atletico Nacional has asked for Chapecoense to be awarded the cup. A statement by Fox Sports Latin America said that six employees from its Brazil operation died in the crash.

The plane lost contact with ground controllers as it approached Medellin at about 22:15 (03:45 GMT), after the pilot reported an electrical fault. It came down in a mountainous area. At least two of the survivors are footballers. They were confirmed to be defender Alan Ruschel and reserve goalkeeper Jackson Follman. Some reports suggest another defender, Helio Neto, was also rescued. Goalkeeper Marcos Padilha, also known as Danilo, was pulled alive from the wreckage but a spokesman said he later died in hospital.The sports network Telemundo Deportes tweeted (in Spanish) that Ruschel was in shock but conscious and talking, and asked to keep his wedding ring and to see his family.

2. South Korea’s President Park ‘willing to resign’ :-

South Korean President Park Geun-hye in Seoul (29 Nov 2016)

South Korea’s President Park Geun-hye has said she has asked parliament to help her find a way to stand down. Ms Park faced growing calls to resign amid an investigation into whether she allowed a long-time friend to influence political decisions for personal gain.

She said she would “leave to parliament everything about my future including shortening of my term”, but did not want to leave a power vacuum. Parliament is due to discuss on Friday whether she should face impeachment.

Some in the ruling party had said the president should stand down “honourably” before it reached that point. Opposition parties accuse her of now trying to escape impeachment. Ms Park has apologised twice before, and has said she is “heartbroken” by the political crisis around her, but has refused to stand down.

Protests against President Park in Seoul (26 Nov 2016)

In Tuesday’s televised address, her third since reports of the scandal began, Ms Park said she would step down “once lawmakers come up with measures to transfer power in a way that minimises any power vacuum and chaos in governance”. A spokesman for the opposition Democratic Party, Youn Kwan-suk, said the speech was a “trick” which “lacked reflection”. “What people want is her immediate resignation, not dragging out and dodging the responsibility to the parliament,” he told the Yonhap news agency.

The scandal stems from the president’s relationship with her close friend, Choi Soon-sil. Ms Choi is accused of trying to extort huge sums of money from South Korean companies. She is also suspected of using her friendship with Ms Park to solicit business donations for a non-profit fund she controlled. It is also alleged that Ms Park passed large numbers of confidential government documents to Ms Choi, via an aide.

Ms Choi is in police detention, facing a string of charges. If parliament passes a motion for Ms Park’s impeachment on Friday, she would face immediate suspension from presidential duties. The prime minister would take over as temporary government head. The Constitutional Court would then have to decide whether to approve the impeachment, a process which could take up to six months.

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