Briefing :- 8/2/17

Here is CurrentHow’s Briefing™ for the 8th of February, 2017 :-

1. Russia has completed supply of S-300 missile systems to Iran :-

Russia has completed supply of S-300 missile systems to Iran: Report
The Russian envoy to Iran said that Russia was preparing to supply Iran with enriched uranium in exchange for heavy water .

Moscow has completed supplies of S-300 missile systems to Tehran in 2016, TASS news agency quoted the Russian envoy to Iran as saying on Wednesday.

Levan Dzhagaryan also said that Russia was preparing to supply Iran with enriched uranium in exchange for heavy water, TASS reported.

Currently, Iran’s import of uranium is under the supervision of the International Atomic Energy Agency under the 2015 international nuclear agreement.

The international nuclear agreement between Iran and six global powers that included five permanent members of UN Security Council and Germany put curbs on Iran’s uranium enrichment programme.

The US had relaxed sanctions imposed on Iran after the deal was agreed upon under the Obama administration.

But, relations between the two countries have soured since Obama left and Trump became president.

Recently, the US imposed fresh sanctions on Iran after it test-fired a ballistic missile. Iran also features on the list seven countries whose citizens have been barred from entering the United States under the travel ban imposed by the Trump administration in an executive order signed by the US president on January 27.

2. Israeli, Palestinian human rights groups to file petition against law allowing settlements :-

Israeli, Palestinian human rights groups to file petition against law allowing settlement
The UN Security Council passed a resolution in December stating that settlements have ‘no legal validity’ and demanding that Israel stop building in the West Bank, including annexed east Jerusalem

sraeli and Palestinian human rights groups are to petition the Supreme Court on Wednesday asking it to strike down a new law allowing expropriation of private Palestinian land for Jewish settlers.

Israeli group Adalah said that it and the east Jerusalem-based Legal Aid and Human Rights Center would file the request on Wednesday afternoon to overturn the “dangerous” law, which was approved by the Israeli parliament late on Monday.

It legalises dozens of wildcat outposts and thousands of settler homes in the occupied West Bank and prompted a Palestinian call for the international community to punish Israel.

The United Nations, the European Union and the Arab League strongly criticised the legislation on Tuesday, although the new administration of US President Donald Trump remained silent.

“This sweeping and dangerous law permits the expropriation of vast tracts of private Palestinian land,” Adalah`s lawyer Suhad Bishara said in a statement.

“It violates the property rights both of resident and refugee Palestinians.”

Israel`s attorney general has said the law is unconstitutional and could open the country up to prosecution at the International Criminal Court, based in The Hague.

The UN Security Council passed a resolution in December stating that settlements have “no legal validity” and demanding that Israel stop building in the West Bank, including annexed east Jerusalem.

Bishara said the new law flouted that resolution.

“The transfer of the occupying power`s civilian population into occupied territory is a war crime,” she said.

3.  Court hearing looms on Trump travel ban :-

Court hearing looms on Trump travel ban
US Government figures released in Tuesday showed the United States admitted 113 refugees on Monday, including 100 Syrians 

President Donald Trump’s order temporarily banning US entry to people from seven Muslim-majority countries came under intense scrutiny on Tuesday from a federal appeals court that questioned whether the ban unfairly targeted people over their religion.

During a more than hour-long oral argument, a three-judge panel of the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals pressed a government lawyer whether the Trump administration’s national security argument was backed by evidence that people from the seven countries posed a danger.

Judge Richard Clifton, a George W Bush appointee, posed equally tough questions for an attorney representing Minnesota and Washington states, which are challenging the ban. Clifton asked if a Seattle judge’s suspension of Trump’s policy was “overbroad”.

The 9th Circuit said at the end of the session it would issue a ruling as soon as possible. Earlier on Tuesday, the court said it would likely rule this week but would not issue a same-day ruling. The matter will ultimately likely go to the US Supreme Court.

Trump’s January 27 order barred travelers from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen from entering for 90 days and all refugees for 120 days, except refugees from Syria, whom he would ban indefinitely.

Trump, who took office on January 20, has defended the measure, the most divisive act of his young presidency, as necessary for national security.

The order sparked protests and chaos at US and overseas airports. Opponents also assailed it as discriminatory against Muslims in violation of the US Constitution and applicable laws.

A federal judge in Seattle suspended the order last Friday and many travelers who had been waylaid by the ban quickly moved to travel to the United States while it was in limbo.

4. Syrian President Bashar Al- Assad feels Trump’s pledge to fight terror is ‘promising’ :-

Image result for bashar al assad

Syria’s leader has praised US President Donald Trump’s rhetoric on terror, saying the new US President’s pledge to prioritize the fight against terrorism, including ISIS, was promising.

President Bashar al-Assad, whose government is waging a bloody civil war, told Belgian media that it was too early “to expect anything practical,” from the US President but that he had high hopes for a cooperative effort between the US and Russia to engage ISIS.

“Trump during the campaign and after the campaign is promising regarding the priority of fighting terrorists, and mainly ISIS, that’s what we’ve been asking for during the last six years,” Assad said. “It’s still early to expect anything practical. It could be about the cooperation between the US and Russia, that we think is going to be positive for the rest of the world, including Syria.”
It’s not the first time the Syrian leader has praised Trump. In an interview with state media agency, SANA, last December, Assad said the then President-elect would be a “natural ally” if he held fast to his hard line on terrorists. The strongman, who has ruled Syria since taking the reins of power from his father in July 2000, said that his government had left “no stone unturned” in attempts to bring opposition parties to the bargaining table in an attempt to end the civil war.
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